[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text] Apples are wonderful, but it only takes one bad apple to spoil the bunch. The same can be said of employees. Most are wonderful, well-intentioned contributors to a culture of success. However, one employee acting irresponsibly can cause a great deal of harm to any organization. For example, take the recent case of Pennsylvania State University and their former assistant football coach, Jerry Sandusky. For the few people in the country unfamiliar with this tragedy, Jerry Sandusky was convicted in June of sexually abusing several boys. Most were abused inside of campus buildings, which is not only horribly tragic, but put the university itself under legal fire. According to Chad Hemenway of Property Casualty 360, Penn State finds itself now sorting through multiple settlements for Sandusky’s victims.
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text] I tightened my helmet, secured my kneepads, and snapped my buckles into place. I was nine and it was rollerblade time. I always had a great time cruising the mean sidewalks of suburbia in my neon rollerblades, but this day was exceptionally great. I even landed a jump. Then it happened. A furry little monster blindsided me from behind, and I went down. Long story short, my rollerblades were viciously and brutally attacked by the neighbor’s three-pound Pomeranian, Mr. Fluffy.
As a landlord, I was stunned to hear the news last week of an opinion issued by the Kentucky Supreme Court, which stated that landlords could be held liable if their tenants’ dog bites someone. Now, instead of simply weighing the usual wear-and-tear costs associated with allowing dogs in rental units, landlords will need to determine whether renting to dog owners could put their very livelihood at stake. Jeffrey Greenberger, attorney for the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky Apartment Association, responded to the opinion by calling it “scary.” He added he “knows of no other case where the landlord is treated as though he owns the tenant's pet.”