Directors of HOA organizations have the unenviable task of completing large “to do” lists while assuming the risk of offending neighbors if they don’t like your decisions.  While maintaining the common areas in their neighborhood, directors must:
  • Act in good faith and candor
  • Act in the interests of another and avoid transactions that result in personal gain
  • Not exert undo pressure or act without the knowledge and consent of those he represents
Running a business is a matter of managing the ups and downs.  Hopefully more ups than downs.  Whether part of the board or one of the top executives in a corporation, you realize you’ve got to handle the pitch and roll in order to keep the business afloat.  Particularly in these difficult economic times. During financially difficult times people are more prone to seek out and take legal action against any perceived corporate misstep.  Top-level decisions can be challenged by investors, regulators, and even criminal prosecutors.   And, so it is more important than ever that directors understand their obligations and potential liabilities.
Confucius, once said, “Before you embark on a journey of revenge, dig two graves.” In a better world, such words of wisdom would cause at very least a moment of reflection, but alas today’s modern society abounds with stories of revenge and retaliation gone awry. When it comes to retaliation in the workplace, it’s important for employers and managers to remember that prevention is much preferred to the bitter pill of litigation. That’s because, historically speaking, it’s typically the company that ends up taking the blame in retaliation suits. In fact, recent studies indicate that an employee who files a retaliation lawsuit is more likely to prevail at trial and recover significant damages than an employee filing a typical discrimination claim. What makes retaliation claims so much different? One theory would indicate that jurors, while slow to believe that managers are racist or sexist, are much more likely to find those same individuals capable of seeking revenge on someone looking to hurt the company. It’s simply human nature.
If your work clothes are workout clothes and your office is a gym, you are in the market for fitness instructor insurance. Your job is to motivate people to reach past their limits to do one more crunch, bench press, or squat. You coach them through new moves, correct their form, and then push them to do even better. Fitness instructors are sought after by a growing baby boomer population as this generation strives to remain active throughout their lives. Years of education, experience and building your client-base has formed the foundation for your business. You don't want to loose everything over one bad experience.
Owning property carries a fair amount of risk. The factors that make you, the landlord, the most vulnerable are, damage to property either by tenant or disaster, and lawsuits. Many landlords depend on the income from rental properties to make payments on their current residence so it is important to protect yourself so that you are not without this income. Here are some facts you should consider when choosing landlord insurance coverage. Not all policies are equal– This is one of those categories where you get what you pay for. XINSURANCE will consider the type of property you own and customize coverage, premiums, deductibles and financing to suit your specific needs.
Most people consider insurance when it comes to their car or their house because it’s required in order to get a loan. But renter’s insurance is another thing. Many renters live under misconceptions about the need for insurance. For example, some believe that the landlord's insurance will cover them in case of theft, or their roommate's insurance will include them, or that they are still covered under their parents' homeowners insurance. The truth is, in order to protect your belongings you must get coverage for them yourself.